voestalpine Roll Forming Corporation

About Us

Shaping precise components, from start to finish

With a history dating back to 1947 and supporting some of today’s most recognized manufacturers, voestalpine RFC’s advanced roll forming operations deliver custom shapes and complete assemblies that conform to the most demanding specifications. And with engineering, design, tooling and manufacturing all co-located within close proximity to each other, we can deliver fully integrated roll forming solutions that produce larger volumes of components with exceptionally high quality standards while still meeting strict cost controls.

 

What is Roll Forming?

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Quality certifications

Through some of the most stringent quality control standards across numerous industries, we have established a high level of confidence with our customers and a leadership position in customized roll forming offerings.

  • ISO 9001:2008
  • Aerospace third-party certification
  • NADCAP accreditations (multiple)
  • RoHS, WEEE environmental compliance
  • Conflict Minerals: All raw materials supplied to voestalpine Roll Forming Corporation (RFC) shall be Conflict Mineral Free per Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

Who we are

Offering an unmatched level of roll forming technology and business support services, our North American presence is enhanced through our relationship with global metals processing leader voestalpine AG. Together, we provide leading component fabrication and lifecycle management that has added operational value to leading brands for decades.

 

voestalpine AG is headquartered in Linz, Austria, and operates more than 500 production and sales companies in more than 50 countries around the world. A global leader in metal processing technologies, voestalpine AG consists of four distinct business divisions including the Metal Forming Division, which is home to RFC. This division’s flexible, mid-sized units have the expertise to provide their customers with fast solutions to problems in all phases of the development and production process.

Timeline

RFC’s story begins with one man’s vision of a company that would be prosperous while proactively meeting each customer’s needs. It would be a company built on a foundation of dedicated employees, sustained by a strong work ethic and creative ideas while always respecting the needs and contributions of individuals.
Swipe images to view the RFC Timeline

1947

Barlow W. Brooks leaves Reynolds Metals and starts Roll Forming Corporation by mortgaging his home. Early customers include manufacturers of commercial refrigeration showcases for supermarkets.

1952

Supporting military efforts during the Korean War through the production of parts for Quonset Huts, RFC experiences its strongest year with net sales of over $1.7 million. Investments are made in new equipment and facilities.

1960

Reinvestments in the company begin to pay off in the form of large and numerous orders and an increased customer base. Martin Steel Company selects RFC to supply structural shapes for buildings used by the Engineer Corps, the beginning of shape production for the company.

1966

“Metalphonics”, a publication by a major steel manufacturer, recognizes Roll Forming Corporation as one of the leading roll formers in the country. Annual sales for the year exceed $3.7 million.

1970s

As RFC begins making wing supports for the burgeoning space shuttle program and roll formed window frames for Mack Trucks, RFC adds bending and welding operations to its repertoire.

1973

Continuing to represent innovation and leadership in the industry, RFC is assigned U.S. Patent 3,756,057. Entitled “Roll Forming”, this invention relates to the production of elongated metal strip sections of desired shapes. 

1982

RFC reaches a level of financial strength to continue developing new processes, including the development of the first rolling line capable of making continuous welded roll formed shapes.

1986

Expanded work for the aerospace industry leads to the creation of the first viable continuous fiber thermoplastic composites utilizing hot roll forming techniques.

1993

RFC enters a new phase of the automotive market through the fabrication of seat track components. This ushers in high-volume work on standard shapes that needed to adhere to high-quality standards.

1995

Years of investment in training and improving operational issues pay off with significant increases in profits, along with the addition of global customers Andersen Corporation, Boeing and Lockheed Martin.

1996

The number of unique shapes produced by RFC over the previous five decades tops 4,000. Construction of a new 58,000-square-foot facility to serve Aerospace operations, as well as meet capacity for heat-treating, aging and cleaning, is completed.

2000

Roll Forming Corporation is acquired by voestalpine AG; a globally active group with a number of specialized and flexible companies that produce, process and further develop high-quality steel products.

2001

Construction is completed on RFC’s 150,000-square-foot facility in Indiana, built to meet growing demands for the ROPS/FOPS, Solar and Material Handling markets. Modeled after voestalpine AG plants in Europe, this new location enhances capacity and facilitates shared technology and designs for global customers.

2008

RFC acquires Pennsylvania-based Sharon Custom Metal Forming. This strategic purchase expands RFC’s geographic footprint and augments capabilities for design, engineering and manufacturing of custom roll formed and welded shapes. 

2012

Substantial growth in the Aerospace segment leads to a 31,000-square-foot expansion of RFC’s Shelbyville facility. Customers including Gulfstream, Cessna and Lockheed Martin gain further access to capacity for airframe structural stingers along with welded titanium seat tracks for the Boeing 787 Dreamliner.

2013

The addition of a roll forming mill with in-line welding capabilities and a multi-axis laser cutting machine further distinguishes RFC as a leading provider of customized components while doubling the Jeffersonville plant’s capacity.